May 1998

Sources of Health Insurance and Characteristics of the Uninsured: South Atlantic States, 1996

Delaware

  • The percentage of Delaware's nonelderly population (under age 65) without health insurance coverage, 14.8 percent, was lower than the national rate, 17.7 percent. Delaware's nonelderly population also had a higher rate of private coverage, 74.3 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in Delaware -- infants through age 17 -- had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 61.4 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in Delaware, 12.9 percent, was below the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 30.7 percent, and children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely, less than 1 percent.
  • Delaware workers had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 78.3 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 59.3 percent of Delaware workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among Delaware workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 68.8 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 25.0 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Among Delaware workers, the most likely to have employment-based health insurance in their own name were those in wholesale trade, 87.5 percent, and transportation, communications, and utilities, 80.2 percent. Workers in transportation, communications, and utilities had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 7.0 percent, followed by manufacturing workers, 7.1 percent. Workers in agriculture and personal services had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 37.2 percent and 28.8 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 86.2 percent, than part-time workers, 54.3 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 9.6 percent, than part-time workers, 26.9 percent. Among nonworkers, 49.9 percent had employment-based coverage, and 24.3 percent were uninsured.

Maryland

  • The percentage of Maryland's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 12.9 percent, was lower than the national rate, 17.7 percent. Maryland's nonelderly population also had a higher rate of private coverage, 78.4 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in Maryland -- infants through age 17 -- had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 69.4 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in Maryland, 8.1 percent, was below the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes below the federal poverty level were the most likely to be uninsured, 20.6 percent. Children in families with incomes at 200 percent to 399 percent of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 3.1 percent.
  • A higher rate of Maryland workers had employment-based health insurance coverage, 76.1 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 56.1 percent of Maryland workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among Maryland workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 67.3 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 27.5 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Among Maryland workers, the most likely to have employment-based health insurance in their own name were those in government, 71.9 percent, and in finance, insurance, and real estate, 70.7 percent. Workers in government had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 3.0 percent, followed by those in transportation, communications, and utilities, 4.3 percent. Workers in agriculture and personal services had the highest uninsured rates in the state at 53.2 percent and 36.2 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 82.4 percent, than part-time workers, 66.7 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 10.3 percent, than part-time workers, 16.8 percent. Among nonworkers, 44.3 percent had employment-based coverage, and 22.1 percent were uninsured.

District of Columbia (DC)

  • The percentage of DC's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 16.9 percent, was lower than the national rate, 17.7 percent. DC's nonelderly population also had a lower rate of private coverage, 63.0 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in DC -- infants through age 17 -- had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 43.8 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. DC had the lowest rate of employment-based health insurance coverage for children in the U.S. The uninsured rate for children in DC, 14.6 percent, was below the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes at 150 percent to 199 percent of the federal poverty level were the most likely to be uninsured, 27.0 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 5.3 percent.
  • DC workers had a slightly lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 72.2 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 63.5 percent of DC workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among DC workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 73.8 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 35.3 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Among DC workers, the most likely to have employment-based health insurance in their own name were those in the financial, insurance, and real estate, 84.0 percent; and transportation, communications, and utilities, 79.4 percent. Transportation, communications, and utilities workers had the lowest uninsured rate, 6.1 percent, followed by workers in the financial, insurance, and real estate, 6.4 percent. The highest uninsured rates were among workers in construction, 50.5 percent, and personal services, 41.8 percent.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 80.1 percent, than part-time workers, 55.5 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 13.4 percent, than part-time workers, 21.9 percent. Among nonworkers, 24.5 percent had employment-based coverage, and 20.2 were uninsured.

Virginia

  • The percentage of Virginia's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 14.0 percent, was lower than the national rate, 17.7 percent. Virginia's nonelderly population also had a higher rate of private coverage, 73.1 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in Virginia -- infants through age 17 -- had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 61.2 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in Virginia, 10.9 percent, was below the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 29.0 percent. Children in families with incomes of 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 2.6 percent.
  • Virginia workers had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 74.4 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 57.3 percent of Virginia workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among Virginia workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 69.6 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 30.4 percent of those in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Among Virginia workers, the most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in finance, insurance, and real estate, 80.2 percent, and transportation, communications and utilities, 77.8 percent. Finance, insurance, and real estate workers had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 2.3 percent, followed by workers in government, 6.4 percent. Workers in personal services and construction had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 28.2 percent and 22.6 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 81.9 percent, than part-time workers, 68.5 percent. They had a slightly higher uninsured rate, 11.7 percent, than part-time workers, 11.1 percent. Among nonworkers, 46.5 percent had employment-based coverage, and 18.3 percent were uninsured.

West Virginia

  • The percentage of West Virginia's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 17.9 percent, was slightly higher than the national rate, 17.7 percent. West Virginia's nonelderly population also had a lower rate of private coverage, 65.6 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in West Virginia -- infants through age 17 -- had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 54.2 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in West Virginia, 7.9 percent, was below the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 19.4 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, less than 1 percent.
  • West Virginia workers had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 71.1 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 52.0 percent of West Virginia workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among West Virginia's workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 65.3 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 20.7 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Among West Virginia workers, the most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in transportation, communications, and utilities, 80.4 percent, and mining, 89.1 percent. Workers in mining had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 5.3 percent, followed by those in wholesale trade, 6.4 percent. Workers in construction and retail trade had the highest uninsured rates in the state, at 37.7 percent and 35.2 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 82.1 percent, than part-time workers, 58.1 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 14.3 percent, than part-time workers, 29.1 percent. Among nonworkers, 37.3 percent had employment-based coverage, and 20.4 percent were uninsured.

North Carolina

  • The percentage of North Carolina's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 18.2 percent, was higher than the national rate, 17.7 percent. North Carolina's nonelderly population also had a higher rate of private coverage, 72.0 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in North Carolina -- infants through age 17 -- had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 60.2 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in North Carolina, 17.2 percent, was above the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 31.9 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 3.4 percent.
  • North Carolina workers had a higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 74.9 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 60.3 percent of North Carolina workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation. Along with Hawaii and Indiana, North Carolina workers had the second highest rate of workers with employment-based health insurance in their own name. Nevada had the highest.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among North Carolina workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 72.9 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 22.9 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • North Carolina workers most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in transportation, communications, and utilities, 82.0 percent, and government, 78.6 percent. Workers in government had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 5.3 percent, followed by workers in transportation, communications, and utilities, 5.9 percent. Workers in agriculture and construction had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 46.7 percent and 39.4 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 81.2 percent, than part-time workers, 63.6 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 13.9 percent, than part-time workers, 19.1 percent. Among nonworkers, 41.2 percent had employment-based coverage, and 27.1 percent were uninsured.

South Carolina

  • The percentage of South Carolina's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 18.7 percent, was higher than the national rate, 17.7 percent. South Carolina's nonelderly population had a higher rate of private coverage, 71.8 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in South Carolina -- infants through age 17 -- had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 55.1 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in South Carolina, 20.7 percent, was above the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 42.0 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 1.7 percent.
  • South Carolina workers had a slightly higher rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 73.7 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 57.8 percent of South Carolina workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among South Carolina workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 76.6 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 22.1 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • South Carolina workers most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in government, 85.2 percent, and manufacturing, 81.6 percent. Workers in government had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 2.5 percent, followed by workers in transportation, communications, and utilities, 5.6 percent. Workers in construction and personal services had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 49.8 percent and 27.6 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 80.7 percent, than part-time workers, 62.1 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 12.3 percent, than part-time workers, 22.3 percent. Among nonworkers, 46.5 percent had employment-based coverage, and 25.4 percent were uninsured.

Georgia

  • The percentage of Georgia's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 19.7 percent, was higher than the national rate, 17.7 percent. Georgia's nonelderly population also had a lower rate of private coverage, 68.2 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in Georgia -- infants through age 17 -- had a slightly lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 58.3 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in Georgia, 15.2 percent, was above the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 30.4 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 8.2 percent.
  • Georgia workers had a slightly lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 71.2 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 56.3 percent of Georgia workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among Georgia workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 72.9 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 24.3 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Georgia workers most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in wholesale trade, 84.3 percent, and government, 76.6 percent. Workers in finance, insurance, and real estate had the lowest uninsured rates in the state, 4.2 percent, followed by workers in government, 7.3 percent. Workers in agriculture and personal services had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 52.8 percent and 39.4 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 79.5 percent, than part-time workers, 56.4 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 14.5 percent, than part-time workers, 23.6 percent. Among nonworkers, 42.6 percent had employment-based coverage, and 30.1 percent were uninsured.

Florida

  • The percentage of Florida's nonelderly population without health insurance coverage, 22.9 percent, was higher than the national rate, 17.7 percent. Florida's nonelderly population also had a lower rate of private coverage, 64.9 percent, than the national rate, 70.9 percent.
  • Children living in Florida -- infants through age 17 -- had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 49.5 percent, than the national rate, 58.9 percent. The uninsured rate for children in Florida, 18.4 percent, was above the national rate, 14.8 percent.
  • Children living in families with incomes just above the federal poverty level -- 100 percent to 149 percent of poverty -- were the most likely to be uninsured, 27.5 percent. Children in families with incomes at 400 percent or more of the federal poverty level were least likely to be uninsured, 5.7 percent.
  • Florida workers had a lower rate of employment-based health insurance coverage, 65.7 percent, than the national rate, 72.3 percent. Also, 52.7 percent of Florida workers had employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name, compared with 55.2 percent for the nation.
  • Larger firms were more likely than smaller firms to provide coverage. Among Florida workers in firms with 1,000 or more workers, 69.4 percent had coverage in their own name, compared with 25.8 percent of workers in firms with fewer than 10 employees.
  • Florida workers most likely to have employment-based health insurance coverage in their own name were those in government, 80.5 percent, and finance, insurance, and real estate, 70.6 percent. Workers in government had the lowest uninsured rate in the state, 5.0 percent, followed by workers in finance, insurance, and real estate, 10.1 percent. Workers in agriculture and personal services had the highest uninsured rates in the state, 56.4 percent and 40.1 percent, respectively.
  • Among individuals ages 18-64, full-time workers had a higher rate of employment-based coverage, 71.8 percent, than part-time workers, 49.6 percent. They had a lower uninsured rate, 19.8 percent, than part-time workers, 31.0 percent. Among nonworkers, 32.9 percent had employment-based coverage, and 29.3 percent were uninsured.

For more information, contact Ken McDonnell, (202) 775-6342, e-mail: mcdonnell@ebri.org, or visit EBRI online at http://www.ebri.org/facts/index.htm. Source: Employee Benefit Research Institute tabulations of data from the March 1997 Current Population Survey (CPS).

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