‘Trends in Satisfaction and Confidence in Health Care, by Insurance and Health Status: Findings from the 2009 EBRI/MGA Health Confidence Survey,’ and ‘Social Security Reform: How Different Options Might Affect Future Funding’

September 2009, Vol. 30, No. 9
Paperback, 20 pp.
PDF, 383 kb
Employee Benefit Research Institute, 2009

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Executive Summary

Trends in Satisfaction and Confidence in Health Care, by Insurance and Health Status: Findings from the 2009 EBRI/MGA Health Confidence Survey 2009


HCS DATA: This article examines public opinion by insurance status and health status, using data from the 2009 EBRI/Mathew Greenwald Associates Health Confidence Survey. It finds that the uninsured are more likely than individuals with insurance coverage to be dissatisfied with the quality of health care received and they are less confident in various aspects of health care. Similar differences in satisfaction and confidence are found by health status.


THE FEW VS. THE MANY: While these sharp differences in attitudes are not surprising, shoring up the U.S. health system for the uninsured and individuals with chronic conditions means changing the health care system for everyone—notably for those with insurance coverage and in good health. Ultimately, will the needs of the few outweigh the satisfaction of the many?


 


Social Security Reform: How Different Options Might Affect Future Funding


FUNDING SHORTFALL: According to the latest (2009) Social Security Trustees’ report, the program’s long-term funding shortfall currently amounts to –2.00 percent of taxable payroll, meaning that the program would need additional revenues equal to 2 percent of taxable payroll for each year over the next 75 years to match the projected future current-law costs over that time frame.


CUTTING BENEFITS, RAISING TAXES: This article analyzes a range of possible reform provisions that would either reduce benefits (by lowering the scheduled increase in future benefit levels by changes to the benefit formula, or by raising the normal retirement age) or raise taxes (by changing the amount of earnings that are taxable and used for the calculation of benefits under Social Security). All of these provisions have been part of various comprehensive reform proposals over the last two decades.