401(k) Account Balances

EBRI estimates an increase in average 401(k) account balances of 0.30% for the week ending April 20, 2018. EBRI's estimate is based on consistent 401(k) participants with account balances in the database on December 31, 2015.

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May 15 Webinar

Please join EBRI’s webinar on: “Trends in Individual Account Retirement Plan Prevalence, Growth, and More”

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May Policy Forum

Watch the video of EBRI's May 10th Policy Forum. You'll hear about the latest retirement, health, and financial wellbeing developments. Passcode: EBRI201805

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2018 RCS - This year’s Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) finds only a third of retirees very confident in their ability to live comfortably throughout retirement (32 percent). While this is comparable to last year, retiree confidence in having enough money to cover basic expenses and medical expenses has dropped: 80 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering basic expenses this year compared to 85 percent in 2017; and 70 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering medical expenses this year vs. 77 percent in 2017. In addition, retirees’ confidence that Medicare and Social Security will continue to provide benefits equal to what retirees receive today has significantly declined compared to last year, with fewer than half saying they are very or somewhat confident (46 percent very or somewhat confident in Medicare this year vs. 52 percent in 2017; 45 percent very or somewhat confident in Social Security vs. 51 percent in 2017). Only 7 percent of retirees say they are very confident that each of these will continue to provide the same level of benefits they do today.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    The State of Employee Benefits: Findings from the 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey

    The State of Employee Benefits: Findings from the 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey One effect of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) has been to create a more standard approach to employer-paid benefits between various employers. This leaves some companies looking for ways to differentiate themselves as employers of choice. Work-life-balance benefits may be the answer. The 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey recently completed by the Employee Benefit Research Institute and Greenwald & Associates finds that 44 percent of employees would give up a wage increase for increased work-life balance benefits like paid time off or telecommuting. Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    Cumulative Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenses After the Age of 70

    The likelihood that a retiree will receive an enormous shock in the form of out-of-pocket health costs may be lower than retirees think, according to new research by EBRI. In our Issue Brief, “Cumulative Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenses After the Age of 70," EBRI researchers show that for those who die at age 95 or later, median out-of-pocket expenses are slightly above $27,000, and regardless of age, median nursing home expenses were zero. But, catastrophes do happen and when they are related to health, nursing home expenses can be a significant driver of cost. Ten percent of this older cohort say they racked up more than $172,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses in, and 5 percent report spending more than $269,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    Asset Decumulation or Asset Preservation? What Guides Retirement Spending?

    While retirement planning models assume that retirees will begin to spend their accumulated assets when they stop working, our Issue Brief, “Asset Decumulation or Asset Preservation? What Drives Retirement Spending?” shows that this isn’t happening. The study finds that regardless of how much Americans had saved, on a median basis, they had spent at the most less than 30 percent of their assets within the first couple of decades of retirement. And, those with the most accumulated assets had spent the least. Retirees with at least $500,000 in assets had spent only 11.8 percent of their assets after 18 years of retirement. Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – March 2018

    Individual Account Retirement Plans: An Analysis of the 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances

    As defined contribution plans have proliferated in the private sector, the assets in individual account retirement plans (IA plans) have become the predominant source of financial assets for the American families holding them. Further, Americans with IA plan assets have larger net worth and are more likely to own a home. As such, any policy that alters this system could have consequences – either positive or negative – for Americans’ ability to fund a comfortable retirement. Read the full article and related Fast Fact. (Mar. 26, 2018)