EBRI Perspectives

Visit EBRI’s blog to learn about the unique challenges that women face due to their longevity in retirement

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401(k) Account Balances

EBRI estimates an increase in average 401(k) account balances of 1.7% for the week ending March 30, 2018. EBRI's estimate is based on consistent 401(k) participants with account balances in the database on December 31, 2015.

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May Policy Forum

Register now for EBRI's May 10th Policy Forum. You'll hear about the latest retirement, health, and financial wellbeing developments.

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Health Plans and Financial Wellness

Fast Fact: Health Plan Design May Be Impacting Financial Well-Being Program Success

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Debt of the Elderly and Near Elderly, 1992–2016 Webinar Recording and Presentation - During a April 11 webinar, EBRI Senior Research Associate, Craig Copeland examined the debt of families with heads ages 55 or older and discussed the trends in debt held by them. EBRI President and CEO, Lori Lucas, provided opening and closing comments. Click here for a replay of this EBRIefing (password: p1$grW81) and click here for the presentation deck.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    Asset Decumulation or Asset Preservation? What Guides Retirement Spending?

    While retirement planning models assume that retirees will begin to spend their accumulated assets when they stop working, our Issue Brief, “Asset Decumulation or Asset Preservation? What Drives Retirement Spending?” shows that this isn’t happening. The study finds that regardless of how much Americans had saved, on a median basis, they had spent at the most less than 30 percent of their assets within the first couple of decades of retirement. And, those with the most accumulated assets had spent the least. Retirees with at least $500,000 in assets had spent only 11.8 percent of their assets after 18 years of retirement. Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – March 2018

    Individual Account Retirement Plans: An Analysis of the 2016 Survey of Consumer Finances

    As defined contribution plans have proliferated in the private sector, the assets in individual account retirement plans (IA plans) have become the predominant source of financial assets for the American families holding them. Further, Americans with IA plan assets have larger net worth and are more likely to own a home. As such, any policy that alters this system could have consequences – either positive or negative – for Americans’ ability to fund a comfortable retirement. Read the full article and related Fast Fact. (Mar. 26, 2018) 

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    Cumulative Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenses After the Age of 70

    The likelihood that a retiree will receive an enormous shock in the form of out-of-pocket health costs may be lower than retirees think, according to new research by EBRI. In our Issue Brief, “Cumulative Out-of-Pocket Health Care Expenses After the Age of 70," EBRI researchers show that for those who die at age 95 or later, median out-of-pocket expenses are slightly above $27,000, and regardless of age, median nursing home expenses were zero. But, catastrophes do happen and when they are related to health, nursing home expenses can be a significant driver of cost. Ten percent of this older cohort say they racked up more than $172,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses in, and 5 percent report spending more than $269,000 in out-of-pocket medical expenses Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – March 2018

    Consumer Engagement in Health Care Among Millennials, Baby Boomers, and Generation X: Findings from the 2017 Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey

    The Millennial generation numbers over 75 million, which is currently larger than the baby-boom generation of about 74.9 million. In addition, the population of Generation X is projected to pass the ageing baby-boom generation in size by 2028. With significant interest in how Millennials differ from prior generations, much of the research examines Millennials in the context of retail markets because of their spending power. Employers are interested in the role of Millennials in the labor force and how that might be different from the roles of prior generations. For example, as employers try to better engage their workers in their health care, they want to understand how different workers may react to different plan design features and other engagement efforts. The Issue Brief and Fast Fact focus on differences in consumer engagement in health care by generational cohorts – i.e., Millennials, Baby Boomers, and Gen Xers. Read the full article and related Fast Fact. (Mar. 22, 2018)