August 29 Webinar

The Far-Reaching Implications of Student Loan Debt

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EBRI's Policy Forum

Learn about the latest research, trends, and regulatory changes affecting retirement, health care and financial wellness. Hear from EBRI researchers, policymakers, plan sponsors, and providers in this post-election discussion of the current state—and the future--of employee benefits.

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EBRI Perspectives

In her most recent blog, CEO Lori Lucas addresses some misconceptions about recent research released by the Employee Benefit Research Institute.

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2018 RCS - This year’s Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) finds only a third of retirees very confident in their ability to live comfortably throughout retirement (32 percent). While this is comparable to last year, retiree confidence in having enough money to cover basic expenses and medical expenses has dropped: 80 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering basic expenses this year compared to 85 percent in 2017; and 70 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering medical expenses this year vs. 77 percent in 2017. In addition, retirees’ confidence that Medicare and Social Security will continue to provide benefits equal to what retirees receive today has significantly declined compared to last year, with fewer than half saying they are very or somewhat confident (46 percent very or somewhat confident in Medicare this year vs. 52 percent in 2017; 45 percent very or somewhat confident in Social Security vs. 51 percent in 2017). Only 7 percent of retirees say they are very confident that each of these will continue to provide the same level of benefits they do today.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – August 2018

    The Relationship Between Health Plan Type, Use of Specialty Medications, and Worker Productivity

    Do specialty meds impact worker productivity? Not much, according to new research from the Employee Benefit Research Institute. Researchers set out to prove a correlation between the increasing cost of specialty meds and higher worker productivity. The mixed results were interesting and have us scratching our heads a bit. Read more here, or take a look at the Fast Facts here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – June 2018

    Current Population Survey: Issues Continue for Retirement Plan Participation and Retiree Income Estimates

    Something’s not adding up. In recent years, the annual Social and Economic Supplement to the Current Population Survey (CPS) has shown significant declines in employment-based retirement plan participation that has not been supported by other government surveys. But what is really behind these findings? That is the question explored in EBRI’s Issue Brief “Current Population Survey: Issues Continue for Retirement Plan Participation and Retiree Income Estimates.” You can read the full report here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – July 2018

    Student Loan Debt: Trends and Implications

    In EBRI’s latest Issue Brief available here, Senior Researcher Craig Copeland focuses on the growing issue of student loan debt. While it is generally recognized that the investment in a college education leads to more earning power for the degree holder, Copeland points out that a growing segment of adults are saddled the debt from incomplete college educations, which is impacting their financial well-being. Read more about this aspect of his research in the Fast Facts available here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – June 2018

    EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model®(RSPM) – Analyzing Policy and Design Proposals

    EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model® (RSPM) – Analyzing Policy and Design Proposals In this new research leveraging the Retirement Security Projection Model,® EBRI’s Research Director Jack VanDerhei examines the impact of various policy initiatives on aggregate retirement savings shortfalls. While most policy initiatives would have limited impact for those already on the verge of retirement, the reduction in retirement deficits could be significant for younger age cohorts. Jack shows that, for the youngest age cohort simulated (those currently ages 35-39), the reductions in retirement deficits would be as much as 23 percent under the Automatic Retirement Plan Act of 2017 (assuming no optouts). You can read the full report here and for a fast-facts overview of RSPM, click here.