401(k) Account Balances

EBRI estimates an increase in average 401(k) account balances of 1.14% for the week ending June 8, 2018. EBRI's estimate is based on consistent 401(k) participants with account balances in the database on December 31, 2015.

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June 20 Webinar

Register: Webinar on the EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model® (RSPM) - Analyzing Policy and Design Proposals

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May Policy Forum

Watch the video of EBRI's May 10th Policy Forum. You'll hear about the latest retirement, health, and financial wellbeing developments. Passcode: EBRI201805

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2018 RCS - This year’s Retirement Confidence Survey (RCS) finds only a third of retirees very confident in their ability to live comfortably throughout retirement (32 percent). While this is comparable to last year, retiree confidence in having enough money to cover basic expenses and medical expenses has dropped: 80 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering basic expenses this year compared to 85 percent in 2017; and 70 percent say they are very/somewhat confident about covering medical expenses this year vs. 77 percent in 2017. In addition, retirees’ confidence that Medicare and Social Security will continue to provide benefits equal to what retirees receive today has significantly declined compared to last year, with fewer than half saying they are very or somewhat confident (46 percent very or somewhat confident in Medicare this year vs. 52 percent in 2017; 45 percent very or somewhat confident in Social Security vs. 51 percent in 2017). Only 7 percent of retirees say they are very confident that each of these will continue to provide the same level of benefits they do today.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – June 2018

    EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model®(RSPM) – Analyzing Policy and Design Proposals

    EBRI Retirement Security Projection Model® (RSPM) – Analyzing Policy and Design Proposals In this new research leveraging the Retirement Security Projection Model,® EBRI’s Research Director Jack VanDerhei examines the impact of various policy initiatives on aggregate retirement savings shortfalls. While most policy initiatives would have limited impact for those already on the verge of retirement, the reduction in retirement deficits could be significant for younger age cohorts. Jack shows that, for the youngest age cohort simulated (those currently ages 35-39), the reductions in retirement deficits would be as much as 23 percent under the Automatic Retirement Plan Act of 2017 (assuming no optouts). You can read the full report here and for a fast-facts overview of RSPM, click here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – May 2018

    Labor Force Participation Rates by Age and Gender and the Age and Gender Composition of the U.S. Civilian Labor Force and Adult Population

    Baby Boomers are aging. In 2019, the last members of the generation (those born in 1964) will turn 55. In this month’s Issue Brief, “Labor Force Participation Rates by Age and Gender and the Age and Gender Composition of the U.S. Civilian Labor Force and Adult Population," EBRI Senior Researcher Craig Copeland examines the impact that aging boomers have had, and will continue to have, on the labor force. “The baby-boom generation has created a wave of sorts moving through the labor force over the past several decades," Copeland says, noting that those ages 65 and older now represent the largest segment of the U.S. population, and that older workers (ages 55 to 64) significantly outnumber their youngest counterparts (ages 16-24). The Issue Brief raises some interesting questions. What is causing the aging of America’s labor force? Is it due to the percentage of older workers staying in the labor force or is it merely caused by the sheer size of the baby boom generation relative to the size of younger generations of workers? And, how will a bimodal labor force—with many older and younger workers and fewer workers at ages in between—impact employer benefit offerings? We invite you to access the Fast Fact on this important topic, and please be on the lookout for an invite to a webinar discussing this research.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – June 2018

    The Impact of Length of Time Enrolled in a Health Plan on Consumer Engagement and Health Plan Satisfaction: Findings From the 2017 Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey

    While consumer-driven health plans (CDHPs) and high deductible health plans (HDHPs) have become increasingly common plan offerings, they are still relatively new compared to traditional health coverage. Researchers from the Employee Benefit Research Institute (EBRI) and Greenwald & Associates set out to determine if engagement in these plans increased with the time participants were enrolled. The findings were perhaps a bit counter-intuitive. In fact, neither overall satisfaction nor consumer engagement increased when participants were in health plans for long periods of time (e.g., 10+ years), regardless of whether the plan was a traditional health plan, consumer-driven health plan (CDHP), or high deductible health plan (HDHP). However, there was some evidence that health savings account (HSA)-eligible health plan enrollees were more engaged in some aspects of their HSA the longer they have been enrolled in their HSA-eligible health plan. The Issue Brief, "The Impact of Length of Time Enrolled in a Health Plan on Consumer Engagement and Health Plan Satisfaction: Findings From the 2017 Consumer Engagement in Health Care Survey” is available here.

  • EBRI Issue Brief – April 2018

    The State of Employee Benefits: Findings from the 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey

    The State of Employee Benefits: Findings from the 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey One effect of the Patient Protection and Affordable Care Act of 2010 (ACA) has been to create a more standard approach to employer-paid benefits between various employers. This leaves some companies looking for ways to differentiate themselves as employers of choice. Work-life-balance benefits may be the answer. The 2017 Health and Workplace Benefits Survey recently completed by the Employee Benefit Research Institute and Greenwald & Associates finds that 44 percent of employees would give up a wage increase for increased work-life balance benefits like paid time off or telecommuting. Access the Issue Brief here, and the accompanying Fast Fact here.